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Marc Baker and Wolter vanDoorninck, owners of EPB&B

Elliott, Powell, Baden & Baker has been covering businesses throughout the Pacific Northwest for over 60 years.  We have a diverse team of insurance professionals.  With both specialists and generalists on our staff, we have the ability to insure any type or size of business risk.

 

We're an independent agency, which means we can choose from a wide variety of insurance companies to find the one that best fits your needs.  Choose any of the categories below to hear more about what we can do for you.

  


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SAIF Corporation's board of directors declared a $100 million dividend for approximately 44,000 current and former Oregon customers.  Customers with policies that ended in 2009 are eligible for the divident.  Individual dividend information will be available to employers through SAIF's website beginning December 1, 2010. 

Checks will be mailed to eligible SAIF policyholders during December.  Dividend amounts will range from 23.75 percent to 28.13 percent of annual premium.  More information available at SAIF.com.

Workplace discrimination claims are at an all-time high and small-business owners might feel vulnerable.  With a difficult economy and new employment laws making charges and lawsuits more likely, every business owner should consider purchasing Employment Practices Liability Insurance (EPLI). 

 

EPLI is a form of liability insurance that provides protection for an employer against claims made by employees, former employees, or potential employees.  It covers claims of discrimination, wrongful termination, sexual harassment and other employment-related allegations. 

 

ACTUAL CLAIMS SCENARIO:  An employee was operating his personal vehicle on an errand for his boss when he struck a middle-aged pedestrian moving in a crosswalk.  This loss exposed the company to a lawsuit and damages in excess of $1 Million. 

Do you have coverage for hired and non-owned automobiles?

Many companies misunderstand the risks related to the use of personal or “non-owned” vehicles for organization or company business.

Whether you have an employee “running an errand” to pick up office supplies or routinely using their personal car for sales and service calls, the company is ultimately responsible for the consequences of their driving.   In my experience, some of the largest and most expensive claims are related to hired and non-owned auto exposures.

Managers and owners need to be certain that individuals who drive their personal cars for company business are screened, trained and have adequate insurance coverage.  Make sure you are covered.  For more information about the hired and non-owned autos used in your business, call Elliott, Powell, Baden & Baker today.

Consider how your business would be impacted by the following:

 

  • A shut down of your computer system due to an outside hacker, introduction of malicious code, a virus, or a threat to shut down your system?
  • The cost of a breach of your customer’s personal information – notification costs, credit monitoring, consumer redress funding, not to mention the costs to rebuild your reputation and restore customer confidence following a breach?
  • Financial and legal costs arising from an alleged misuse of copyrighted material or publishing liability on your website?

 

These are the risks nearly all businesses face today and are realities of the digital economy.  In fact, in the past five years, 345,008,397 records containing “sensitive personal information” have been breached.  Personal information can be easily sold through chat rooms on the Internet.

 

Party Foul: Forklift Driver Spills Booze

$100,000 in product lost in about 2 seconds. And that was the best case scenario. How bad would the loss be if someone had been standing in the aisle? And how does that happen? It looks like the driver is a complete idiot, but I bet if you dig deeper you’ll find some specific issues that lead to it: something like lack of training or experience, a sticky pedal or an employee with a history of carelessness. Even checking aisle widths, shelf heights and stability may have made a difference. When you get to the bottom of it, was it really a freak accident that couldn’t be avoided or was it a series of small precautions that were ignored or omitted?

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