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Serving the Pacific Northwest for over 70 years 

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Marc Baker and Wolter vanDoorninck, owners of EPB&B

Elliott, Powell, Baden & Baker has been covering businesses throughout the Pacific Northwest for over 60 years.  We have a diverse team of insurance professionals.  With both specialists and generalists on our staff, we have the ability to insure any type or size of business risk.

 

We're an independent agency, which means we can choose from a wide variety of insurance companies to find the one that best fits your needs.  Choose any of the categories below to hear more about what we can do for you.

  


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Bitter temperatures can freeze pipes, creating catastrophic property losses and havoc in your life. Every year we have our fair share of cold weather and businesses can be caught unprepared, often resulting in the most costly losses. With proper winter weather preparation, you can minimize the impact of severe weather on your business.

Before winter weather occurs:

·        Add emergency contacts to your emergency plan. Post the list at all telephones, and make copies for all employees to keep with them.

·        Plan for maintenance personnel to properly monitor buildings during cold snaps, upping site visits and checking unoccupied areas of buildings.

·        Properly mark the location of hydrants and sprinkler system post indicator valves for easy cleaning after heavy snow. 

We are beyond thrilled to have landed at number three on the Portland Business Journal's list of Top Insurance Agencies in Portland.  We are the only "local" insurance agency in the top four.  We don't need to be the biggest, we just want to be the best.  Way to go team EPB&B !!

PBJ

Embezzlement crimes are on the rise according to The Portland Police Bureau.  The bureau has fielded 105 cases of embezzlement so far this year, putting 2011 on track to match the 152 cases reported in 2010.  Embezzlement is not only common, it's preventable and insurable.  Check out this recent Portland Business Journal article.  Call EPB&B to get a quote on crime insurance to protect your business against the risk of loss by embezzlement.

The world never stops turning and some organizations never stop working no matter what time it is.  If you're working the night shift, or responsible for employees who are, you're got to take extra care to stay safe.  Sleep deprivation, fatigue, and depression are just some of the more obvious problems that workers on unconventional schedules can face.

To maintain health and sanity all night long, follow these guidelines:

 For managers:

    • Provide adequate staffing.  Employees working overnight need company to help them stay awake and to provide coverage during breaks.  Don't schedule just one or two people for the night shift if they'll need to go all-out for the full eight hours without rest.
    • Allow sufficient breaks.  Nighttime workers will need more frequent rest breaks, not just time off for lunch or dinner.  Give them adequate time to stretch and move around so their concentration stays sharp.  If possible, consider working a short nap break into the routine.  Studies show that brief naps can improve overall night shift performance.
    • Build in some transition time.  Don't expect employees to immediately move from night shifts back to daytime work, or vice versa.  Schedule a day off or two to help them adjust.
    • Include night workers in everyday routine.  Keep employees on the night shift informed about what's going on just as diligently as you do with day shift workers.  Remember to provide them the same training and development opportunities so they don't feel forgotten or left out.

 

June 26 - July 4 is Eye Safety Awareness Week

90% of occupational eye injuries could have been prevented if the victim was wearing eye protection.  If you workers are reluctant to wear eye protection, ask them what their lives would be like if they lost their vision. 

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